Preschool-Based Obesity Prevention Effectiveness Trial: Diversity Supplement

Abstract

The purpose of the supplement is to examine the association between home food availability/accessibility, dietary intake and weight status among African-American preschool children. The specific aims of the project are to:

  1. Identify factors that influence home food availability/accessibility in African-American families with preschool age children.
  2. Refine a measure to assess home food availability/accessibility of energy dense and nutrient dense food options in African-American families with preschool age children.
  3. Examine home food availability/accessibility of energy dense and nutrient dense food options in African-American families with preschool age children.
  4. Investigate the relationship between home food availability/accessibility, dietary intake, and BMI among African-American preschool children.

The core design of the supplemental study matches the design of the parent grant. In the parent grant, eighteen Chicago Public School Preschool Programs (3-5 year old children) have been randomized to a teacher-delivered weight control intervention (WCI) or General Health Control Intervention (GHI). The parent grant is designed to be implemented in two cohorts. A home food availability (specifically targeting availability of fruits and vegetables, high fat/low fat foods, and sweetened drinks) and shopping behavior questionnaire was added to the measures administered to parents in Cohort 2. Baseline data collection for Cohort 2 was completed January 4, 2008 with post intervention and 1 year data collection scheduled for spring and fall 2008 respectively. The home food availability and shopping behavior questionnaire was completed by a total of 334 Cohort 2 parents.

 

Principal investigator
Co-investigator(s)
Start date
09/15/2005
End date
05/31/2011
Total award
$210,830
About this grant

This grant is a supplement to a larger study called Preschool-Based Obesity Prevention Effectiveness Trial.

For more information, contact
Marian Fitzgibbon, PhD
Professor of Medicine
(312) 996-0146